Tag: thrill magazine

Thrill 3.0

Would you believe Thrill Magazine started 9 years ago?

It’s surprising how many people out there don’t know this part of Thrill’s history, Thrill is 9 years old and for the first 4 years it ran as a quarterly print. It has achieved a lot over the years and so many people have put time and energy into this – and it’s now time to start the latest version. 

As many of you might know after spending a couple of years as one of its contributors, Sabina Edwards took ownership in 2017 and, along with Robbie Stevens and LJ, all did some great things with promoting British Longboarding online and in print.

Sabina has put a huge amount of dedication into keeping this alive and has really put all her effort into showcasing as much of a diverse section of longboarders as possible. With a worldwide audience submitting articles and a massively diverse catalogue of skaters she worked with – Thrill has become a champion of skate media putting this as its priority.

Robbie became part of Thrill in the last few years and put his lovely energy into sharing everything and anything that you might have wanted to see. If you are friends with him on Facebook, you can see this same energy with his youtube DJ links at 2 am most weekends!

LJ was the man on the ground for most of last year, achieving some great event coverage after a injury – he worked on Thrill with the leftover skate energy.

Now, in 2021, it is time for the next generation of skaters to take ownership and bring some fresh energy and new content to the UKDH and longboarding dance and freestyle scene!

Meet the team

Bodhi


Location: Cardiff

Skate Disciplines: Downhill & Freeride.

Skills: Photography, Videography & Webdesign.

Associated projects: Slide Perfect Wheels

Instagram: Bodhik_

Samian


Location: London

Skate Disciplines: Downhill, Freeride & lurking.

Skills: Low-quality skate edits, getting people stoked to skate hills, s***-posting, photography and sitting in peoples camp chairs at events.

Associated projects: London Longboards

Instagram: samiantrollope

Georgia


Location: Bristol

Skate Disciplines: Dance & Freestyle.

Skills: Writing / Event organisation / & looking to grow Videography skills.

Associated Projects: UK Ambassador for Longboard Girls Crew & Hosts Bristol Longboard Girls

Instagram: georgeluck

Bumpy


Location: Bristol

Skate Disciplines: A bit of everything, but predominantly Freeride.

Skills: Lliterally just being a grom I guess.

Associated projects: Bristol Longboard Crew

Instagram: bumpy.longboard

” With a big year ahead of us we have a metaphorical ton of ideas to get through… “

Our 12 month plan:

  • To find out what the skate community wants to see from Thrill over the next 12 months. We will be asking for feedback on ideas and directions.
  • We will aim to publish 2 unique articles a month on the Thrill magazine site showcasing as many disciplines and skate crews as possible. The UK is a big place and since the lockdowns started there is a huge appetite to get events kicking off again! 
  • We want to post interviews ( online as we start) of riders who are making a difference to the UK scene or longboarding in general. Help tell their story of how they started to longboard and what keeps them going.
  • There will be Thrill run events popping up across the UK over the next 12 months, for grassroots and multiple disciplines to bring people together to learn new things.
  • We will aim to publish an up-to-date scene report from different areas and the community within them.
  • We plan to continue sharing posts sent to the Thrill and showcase the UK scene and to include every type of skater possible.
  • We will promote what is going on – be that a small session or full-blown event, we want Thrill to be your community central hub of longboarding, and raise the profile of UK longboarding globally!
  • Finally there are plans to create an annual printed issue of Thrill to show what has happened in the past 12 months and a true homage to what Thrill used to be.

With so many projects planned it would be great to have the support of the scene behind this and really make 2021 something special. Please share this with your communities and follow us on social media for more!

A Quick Pry with Bumpy Hales

We pick up our “Quick Pry” series of interviews with members of the UK skateboarding community with this recent conversation between LJ Leme and Bumpy (aka Arthur) Hales.

Continue reading “A Quick Pry with Bumpy Hales”

Postcards from the Philippines ft. Raviane Cordial

Today we hear from Raviane as she shares her skateboarding experience with Isabell Kittell.

Continue reading “Postcards from the Philippines ft. Raviane Cordial”

Postcards from the Philippines ft. James Manait

We carry on a trip around the Philippines via interviews by Isabell Kittel, today featuring James Carlo Manait.

Continue reading “Postcards from the Philippines ft. James Manait”

Postcards from the Philippines

When reaching out for Lockdown Stories, we were thrilled when Isabell from the Aurora district in the Philippines got in touch. Over the coming weeks we will be sharing a series of stories from Isabell and her skate community, but first a little background…

Continue reading “Postcards from the Philippines”

Col de la Sheepy : NYSB#2 by Samian Trollope

With lockdown unwinding, albeit slowly, some of the UKDH skate community got into Wales for a much awaited event. For many, making the journey is as much part of the experience as the ride itself! Thanks to Sam for sharing his experience.

Continue reading “Col de la Sheepy : NYSB#2 by Samian Trollope”

Video : Downhiller by Dilly-Yo! Ft. Full Cask

This excellent music video really caught our imagination. You’ve no doubt all seen and heard it, so we thought we’d gather a bit of background story and see what’s in the pipeline for the future.

Continue reading “Video : Downhiller by Dilly-Yo! Ft. Full Cask”

Drift to the Hill

The Drift to the Centre crew met up with the legendary skater and Tech Slide pioneer Mark Short at Castle Hill on Friday the 13th this month in Falmouth. Team rider Richard Travers tells us more.

Continue reading “Drift to the Hill”

Brighton’s Battle of the Boards 2018

Joe Williams, wordsmith and freestyle dancer extraordinaire, team rider for Smile Longboards and Skate Hog Hill crew member, shares his thoughts on this year’s Brighton’s Battle of the Boards.

Continue reading “Brighton’s Battle of the Boards 2018”

Bela Joyride 2015 By Aaron Skippings

Bad Eisenkappel in Austria is the setting for a 6km long freeride with more hairpins than you can imagine.

Bela, Bela, Bela 

It literally starts on the border of Slovenia which is pretty sweet. The freeride was in one of the most beautiful locations I have ever skated in with amazing scenery to see as you skated down the windy road at near 50mph.A small crew of UKDH including the lush/cult boys made the car journey from blighty to get there shred and drink on .

The weather started off pretty cloudy on the first day but the Bigmountainskate crew still got everyone on the bus on time at 10am ready to head up to the hill. This is a pretty rare site on the first day of any skate event, so first-rate job on that Felix! The road started out patchy but after a few runs it soon dried off and we had some epic runs. I remember stomping hard on my first run which is pretty silly but I was just so excited to skate I had no cares but stoke!

It all started to get pretty crazy as there wasn’t a limit on how many riders could head down the hill at once, this was glorious and it made it interesting having to employ people-slalom most of the way down. Accidents did start to happen including many myself that I may or may not have caused haha (Daniel Shinnie now hates me.) 

The helicopter was called in twice however and after a while it was decided to keep the runs to a certain limit so no more injuries could happen, this was a good choice. After every day we had a super cold clean river to dip into and relax our muscles which really played a key part in our ability to skating so much for the 4 days, I felt good everyday!

Peak weather hit us from day two onwards and gave us blue skies, mountain views and plenty of sunshine. Just what us Brits need, shred thane not rain. We kept smashing the runs in till our legs felt like jelly and oh they did…stoke is a powerful drug and kept us pushing for more ,searching for more smiles, even if we couldn’t take anymore. No matter where you travel and who you skate with this is always the same, if your totally trashed and out of energy you know you have had a good time. For me Bela delivered on all levels and Bigmountainskate have set the bar for freeride events.

We did around 27 drops at Bela which is a stupendous amount in 4 days, a run is nearly 10 minutes long and it equals 180km of skating.

I’d like to thank felix and everyone at Bigmountainskate for putting in all the hard work to get this done. It was a truly epic event and I shall be back! Not to mention Alex Frischauf for filming some epic footage of everyone.

 

Click here to visit Bigmountainskate's Facebook

SFOL Dogfight @ No.10 by Aaron Godfrey & Lj Leme

 Almost a year ago to the date since our first visit to the awesome No.10 and after much speculation about bad weather, we ran it a 2nd time. The second ever BDSL affiliated event, it was a rad day in warm sunny conditions.

Photos by Nigel Scarr and Robbie Stevens

 After some practice runs, we went for it. Two man heats on points, but after the first heat Liam Hughes took a pretty hard  slam followed by a big roll that injured his shoulder and ended his day, thank skaten for best bail award.

So we changed things slightly and went on to 3 man heats. Some good tight racing and of course some gnarly crashes, all part of the fun.

An outlaw wouldn't be complete without a visit from a nice police officer, who after 5 minutes was more than happy with what we were doing, wished us well and went on her merry way, smile and wave everybody!

We then proceeded with some more tasty racing and after the last run we had 3 riders with same points in joint 2nd place, so in true SFOL style we made them race again! This however took some convincing due to countless slams and exhaustion but relentlessly they raced putting the podium as follows..

1st: Jonny Braund – Vandem Mfg 

2nd: Alex Clark – Newton's shred, skoa trucks.

3rd:  Aaron Godfrey 

4th: Jooz Hughes – VanDem Mfg 

We all know that podiums mean prizes, this wouldn't have been possible without the continuous support and generosity from shops out there, so a very big thank you to our good friends at VanDem MFG, Lush Longboards and Surf n Turf Boardshop for the goodies and stickers (EVERYBODY LOVES STICKERS!!) Thank to ThrillMag for the coverage. And to AOB for the surprise visit and water relief. (Some of us only took beer.)

This is what you guys had to say:

As with every outlaw, things wouldn't happen without marshalls and great team work, so to Pete Titt, Judy Clifton and Robbie Roadkill Stevens, thank you for all your help!

Thank to all the riders too for coming along and final thanks to LJ a long time pushing power in SFOL once again resisting the urge to drop all and pulling the organisation together.

Until the next one amigos. Skate hard, stay safe!

 

360 Slide Shuv Trick-Tip by Nye Quinn

The No Longer Elusive 360 Slide Shuv. 

The 360 Slide Shuv is one of those “tricks” that people either love or hate. It is known to make the blood of haughty skaters boil when people get over-hyped at landing such a trick. They will be disdainful either because they landed it ages ago (realising the tricks exclusivity is vanishing), or they're aware that they themselves could never land it, even if they wanted to. Yet, some argue the hype is well deserved, the trick being an instant crowd favourite with a reputation for being very difficult to master. Conquering the 360 Slide Shuv takes a while – or, more precisely, an agonisingly lengthy period of time during which the trick seems permanently unattainable- but, in spite of this, when landed once it will instantly click and wont leave you in a hurry.

The 360 Slide Shuv peaked during the golden age of soft wheel tech that proliferated during the awe-inspiring reign of Michael Virgin. It became, what can only be described as, the holy-grail of technical longboard “tricks.” It was the foundation of, and hence the key to, all of the young Virgin's fantastically complicated manoeuvres in his Apex 40 edit. However, Virgin's sudden rise was rivalled by his equally sudden plummet to infamy and, accompanying his fall, so crashed down the reputation of the 360 Slide Shuv. Since then, 360 Slide Shuvs have, indeed, fallen from esteem and are regarded with contempt. The longboarding community now has, at its centre, a need for speed and an admiration for steeze. Yet there are a few, still, who remain bastions of technical and creative longboarding by dabbling in the dark arts of every skating discipline. Besides, who can deny that a technical or creative trick only adds a breath of fresh air to a longboarding edit? Furthermore, when the initiation of this manoeuvre becomes more consistent, the 360 Slide Shuv is always a lovely starter or ender to a line.

I vividly remember the seemingly endless, entirely fruitless and definitely painful hours spent labouring over this “trick.” I also remember how ecstatic I was when I finally owned it. Consequently, in answer to the innumerable amount of times I've been asked how it's done, I will attempt to put some out of their misery and explain the rudiments of this very strange manoeuvre. But be warned, as this trick propagates, so will hatred for it. Remember too that, those who chastise you for learning it are, deep, deep down (so deep down that they perhaps don't even realise it) just jealous. hours spent labouring over this “trick.” I also remember how ecstatic I was when I finally owned it. Consequently, in answer to the innumerable amount of times I've been asked how it's done, I will attempt to put some out of their misery and explain the rudiments of this very strange manoeuvre. But be warned, as this trick propagates, so will hatred for it. Remember too that, those who chastise you for learning it are, deep, deep down (so deep down that they perhaps don't even realise it) just jealous. 

The ground in the picture is incredibly sticky, hence why the wheel is lifting off in one of the pictures.

Difficulties:

– The scissor kick is the hard part and you simply have to keep practising it. When you do eventually get it right, the board will be spinning right in front of you. Practise kicking both feet together and then regulate both feet so that you're not kicking out too much with one foot and too little with the other.

– Not jumping at the same time as scissor kicking causes many issues. To overcome this common problem you just have to commit. Attempt to get the front foot on the board first; the back foot will follow. If you only look at the front foot, and get it to land on the deck, Steezus will take care of the rest. 

One-Up your 360 Slide Shuv to a Backside Slide Bigspin :

  • During your front foot push your body follows round and it's all in one motion
  • Rather than just kicking back with your back foot, you also have to drag the board round with it as you jump.
  • As I've become more consistent with this trick I've ended up jumping a lot less. I tend to focus more on spinning round with the board than jumping and this tends to make the initiation simpler and the landing more consistent.
  • Unlike the 360 Slide Shuv, you have to push more with your front foot but much less of a kickback with your back foot. Your back foot should drag the board round to start with but, quite conveniently, your rotating body manages to do half of the work in getting the board to spin.
  • I lead entirely with my front foot for this trick. If you think about planting your leading foot on the board the other one will follow. 
  • The biggest problem with this trick is, by far, committing. It's very hard to get the full 360 rotation because you can't concentrate on the “exploding stage” and the board will often consequently halt at 270 degrees. To overcome this, you simply have to push more forcefully with your front foot, and make sure you drag the board round with your back foot.
  • If you find you aren't landing on the deck then you're not pushing forward with your front foot enough. Your body spins but it spins following your front foot, the back foot drags the board round and follows your body.

More Sources:

Youtube “Longboarding: Teck Is Love, Teck Is Life” for these tricks in motion.

Don't forget to hit the 'like' button!

Trampa : Street Carver Review by Dale Goodwin

UK Company Trampa sent us over one of their new Street Carver boards for us to test and play skateboards with.

Let’s start with a little information about Trampa, it all started somewhere around 2002 in Nottingham (and it is still there now.) Yes, this is a UK company imagined and built from the ground up. Their primary products are Mountainboards, Kiteboards and all the little bits and bobs in-between. They tailor the flex of their Decks specific to the riders weight, height & riding ability and then custom constructs the components by hand. That means totally bespoke boards, made especially for you! They are one of the biggest names in the sport of Mountainboarding and currently the only board Manufacturer to sponsor the ATBA UK Mountainboard Competition series.

If you think of yourself as an engineering nerd I implore you to check out their website and learn about the construction processes. Their boards come at a considerable cost, however, as you are buying something built in the UK that also comes with a LIFETIME GUARANTEE!  I know, right ?!

Their latest creation is the Trampa Street Carver, a Longboard based on their standard Mountainboard design. You can buy all the parts separately (the deck, king pins, springs, baseplates, hangers) if you are a tinkering type and like putting things together yourself!

The deck is the same as their ‘Holy Pro’ Mountainboard deck, a 91cm long, 2.5kg flexible deck with 35 degree angled tips at each end. It comes with a bolt kit and fully gripped.

The trucks are spring channel trucks, they provide a lot of turn as you’d expect from a carver, look uber cool but unfortunately don’t allow you to pump. The initial turn is very easy and a lightweight child would have no problem turning the board. This board isn’t for bombing hills but you could give it a try if you wanted! It is much more of a commuter and play-about board.

The axles fit any standard skateboard wheel you might have laying around, but the 83mm, 76a Trampa Stickies have lots of grip and roll speed, which is what you want for pushing/carving. 

When taking the street carver out with some of Cheltenham Longboard Club, the general consensus was that it feels strange under your feet, the feel of one of these decks is unique and very different to anything you can find in the longboard market at the moment. They are a lot of fun to carve hard on without the risk of wheel bite. The board does feel heavy, heavier than most other ‘Carver’ Longboards, but Trampa build their products to be unbreakable and their decks have a lifetime guarantee. 

The perfect customer for the Street Carver would be anyone who’s tried Mountainboarding before and wants to get into Longboarding, the boards have a very similar feel. Anyone starting Longboarding for the first time would also enjoy learning on this board and getting a feel for LDP & Carving.

Click here for more information, to purchase a Trampa Street Carver (they have global distribution), or to just check out their website.

For Social Media click below.

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TMI LilyHammer Event Report by Connor Finch

Photos, write up and gif from the first IDF TMI LilyHammer!

The UK crew for TMI Lilyhammer consisted of: Will Stephenson, Kolby Parks, Tom Campbell, Big Ben Stainer, Alex Bailey, Ras, Jenny, Aaron Skippings, Cam Deegan, Duncan Kay and myself (Connor Finch).

For a reason that I now cannot remember, we decided that we wanted to drive to Norway, it meant travelling through a lot of amazing places and in a way it was pretty fun. We arrived at the hill in the dead of night, driving up and down a few times trying to find the campsite gave us the opportunity to get overly excited about the road we were itching to go and skate!

30 minutes later we reached our campsite and home for the next few days, we mingled with skaters from all over the world and were greeted by the loudness that is Ras. Max Whipperman concealed in the forest, laden with axe and pure man strength, chopped down trees for the fire.

Everyone gathered some sleep,in-spite of high stoke levels. The morning began with leathering up and set-up tuning for an amazing few days of downhill fun. Nervously we took our first runs, the customary ‘chill’ run. The more runs we took the more confidence we gained and could start perfecting parts of the track.

The hill was one of the most fun I've ever skated, lots of sweepy grippy corners and some tight grip right handers as well as the three left handers that were defiantly drift corners. The pavement was butter smooth and alarmingly slippery, in fact something that came as a surprise to most of us was that scrubbed wheels gripped more than fresh ones… Strange eh?

We got the bus back to the campsite and sat around the fire with marshmallows! We decided to go and explore around the local area and found some really fun hills in the local forest, no cars and freshly paved black Tarmac with fairly steep corners! Most of our evenings were spent playing Kendama, socialising with other riders from around the world and skating the local forrest hills! In the Kendama battles with Aswag, Dillon Stephens and Adam Persson I didn't land a single trick, Even though I had been training my downhill Kendama skills at HogHill.

The next morning we were all given our transponders for the qualifying runs. The first half of the day was spent testing the timing system and so we squeezed in many warm up runs. Qualifying is a chance to test yourself and see how much you can improve your time throughout the day. The whole UK crew killed it and I had some of the best drops of my life, pack runs with Daniel Luna, Jimmy Riha, Dillon Stephens and Adam Persson.

We headed down to the waterfall at the bottom of the road, we all bravely jumped in, even though it froze our nips off, it was actually quite refreshing thinking about it now.

It doesn't get dark in Norway which results in staying up longer than you expected and being super tired in the morning. The UK crew were treated to free entertainment provided by team Venom, alcohol, cameras and puke and thats all I will say about that!

Racing day came and it’s all about having fun with your friends. Interesting fact: Justin Rolo was racing with a broken kneecap which is why he was going for the sandbagging technique, very impressive to win the whole bracket with such an injury! I only managed to get third in the my final heat however and the top two from each heat go though so I was out. 

The UK crew then watched the top dogs in their heats and screamed through the finals. The end result was Thiago Gomes Lessa in first, Dillon Stephens in second, Aleix Gallimo third, and Adam Persson fourth. 

Finally we started the longest car journey I have ever been on, around 30 hours driving each way… We drove to Amsterdam where we stayed for the night. Well I was asleep most of the journey but anyway we all got up at stupid o clock in the morning and started searching for a McDonalds to refresh us for the final leg home.

Overall I had an amazing time at the TMI Lilyhammer race, along with Kozakov it was probably one of the best experiences of my life and I can't wait to go back next year. I have progressed and a learned a lot this year.

The best thing about euro tour is making tonnes of new friends, travelling, seeing the world and making memory's that will last a lifetime and that is exactly why I love the Downhill Skateboarding community so much.

For more about Norway and LilyHammer watch this nice little video from Madrid.