360 Slide Shuv Trick-Tip by Nye Quinn

The No Longer Elusive 360 Slide Shuv. 

The 360 Slide Shuv is one of those “tricks” that people either love or hate. It is known to make the blood of haughty skaters boil when people get over-hyped at landing such a trick. They will be disdainful either because they landed it ages ago (realising the tricks exclusivity is vanishing), or they're aware that they themselves could never land it, even if they wanted to. Yet, some argue the hype is well deserved, the trick being an instant crowd favourite with a reputation for being very difficult to master. Conquering the 360 Slide Shuv takes a while - or, more precisely, an agonisingly lengthy period of time during which the trick seems permanently unattainable- but, in spite of this, when landed once it will instantly click and wont leave you in a hurry.

The 360 Slide Shuv peaked during the golden age of soft wheel tech that proliferated during the awe-inspiring reign of Michael Virgin. It became, what can only be described as, the holy-grail of technical longboard “tricks.” It was the foundation of, and hence the key to, all of the young Virgin's fantastically complicated manoeuvres in his Apex 40 edit. However, Virgin's sudden rise was rivalled by his equally sudden plummet to infamy and, accompanying his fall, so crashed down the reputation of the 360 Slide Shuv. Since then, 360 Slide Shuvs have, indeed, fallen from esteem and are regarded with contempt. The longboarding community now has, at its centre, a need for speed and an admiration for steeze. Yet there are a few, still, who remain bastions of technical and creative longboarding by dabbling in the dark arts of every skating discipline. Besides, who can deny that a technical or creative trick only adds a breath of fresh air to a longboarding edit? Furthermore, when the initiation of this manoeuvre becomes more consistent, the 360 Slide Shuv is always a lovely starter or ender to a line.



I vividly remember the seemingly endless, entirely fruitless and definitely painful hours spent labouring over this “trick.” I also remember how ecstatic I was when I finally owned it. Consequently, in answer to the innumerable amount of times I've been asked how it's done, I will attempt to put some out of their misery and explain the rudiments of this very strange manoeuvre. But be warned, as this trick propagates, so will hatred for it. Remember too that, those who chastise you for learning it are, deep, deep down (so deep down that they perhaps don't even realise it) just jealous. hours spent labouring over this “trick.” I also remember how ecstatic I was when I finally owned it. Consequently, in answer to the innumerable amount of times I've been asked how it's done, I will attempt to put some out of their misery and explain the rudiments of this very strange manoeuvre. But be warned, as this trick propagates, so will hatred for it. Remember too that, those who chastise you for learning it are, deep, deep down (so deep down that they perhaps don't even realise it) just jealous. 

made at imgflip.com

The ground in the picture is incredibly sticky, hence why the wheel is lifting off in one of the pictures.

Difficulties:

- The scissor kick is the hard part and you simply have to keep practising it. When you do eventually get it right, the board will be spinning right in front of you. Practise kicking both feet together and then regulate both feet so that you're not kicking out too much with one foot and too little with the other.

- Not jumping at the same time as scissor kicking causes many issues. To overcome this common problem you just have to commit. Attempt to get the front foot on the board first; the back foot will follow. If you only look at the front foot, and get it to land on the deck, Steezus will take care of the rest. 

One-Up your 360 Slide Shuv to a Backside Slide Bigspin :

  • During your front foot push your body follows round and it's all in one motion
  • Rather than just kicking back with your back foot, you also have to drag the board round with it as you jump.
  • As I've become more consistent with this trick I've ended up jumping a lot less. I tend to focus more on spinning round with the board than jumping and this tends to make the initiation simpler and the landing more consistent.
  • Unlike the 360 Slide Shuv, you have to push more with your front foot but much less of a kickback with your back foot. Your back foot should drag the board round to start with but, quite conveniently, your rotating body manages to do half of the work in getting the board to spin.
  • I lead entirely with my front foot for this trick. If you think about planting your leading foot on the board the other one will follow. 
  • The biggest problem with this trick is, by far, committing. It's very hard to get the full 360 rotation because you can't concentrate on the “exploding stage” and the board will often consequently halt at 270 degrees. To overcome this, you simply have to push more forcefully with your front foot, and make sure you drag the board round with your back foot.
  • If you find you aren't landing on the deck then you're not pushing forward with your front foot enough. Your body spins but it spins following your front foot, the back foot drags the board round and follows your body.

More Sources:

Youtube “Longboarding: Teck Is Love, Teck Is Life” for these tricks in motion.

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